Unwrapping the Multiverse from a 3lb Package

Stardate: 11294.2

And, here is the final version – ready for submission on the 13th! Thanks for all your insightful feedback!

PS: The Topic for the essay again is: “brief summary of your academic interests, career goals, and relevant background experience.”


“I used to think that the brain was the most wonderful organ in my body. Then I realized who was telling me this.” – Emo Philips

The two-fold purpose of acquiring knowledge is to better understand the fabric of existence and to serve others. Period. This strand from my ethical genome is the basis for my interest in, and application to, the Neuroscience theme at the UAB GBS. And, I believe, my interdisciplinary educational background, with its strong emphasis on research and innovation, coupled with two decades of professional experience and global service engagements form a strong foundation for successfully completing the program. In addition to highlighting supporting biographical elements, I will also share some of my observations on the history of our future related to neuroscience and the contribution I hope to make in shaping that future.

During my undergraduate years, I had the opportunity to conduct extensive research in computer science, materials science, and economics. At the time, C++ was in its infancy, much about the fundamental properties of borosilicate glasses was yet undiscovered, and the Eurozone was little more than a treaty signed in Maastricht. And yet, two of these research projects culminated in honors theses earning me a magna cum laude and the designation of a double Richter scholar. Much of this success was due to the deliberate inculcation of research fundamentals by my faculty advisors. While the journal publications and theses are now two decades old, the inculcated principles of perseverance, objectivity, and curiosity remain fresh. And fortunately, these enriching encounters with the edges of human knowledge did not end with graduation.

Over the last twenty years, my career path has meandered through many exciting sojourns of collaborations with brilliant minds to develop innovative business models and exciting computational solutions – including artificial intelligence engines to solve NP-hard problems. Intertwined with this, like the second strand of a double helix, my volunteer service engagements add a global context, highlight the role of knowledge deficits in creating socio-economic imbalances and the economics of poverty, and offer a platform for deploying time and knowledge in advancing humanity. As I look to the future from this lens, I see three emergent trends – here in the United States and globally – which provide the impetus for my engagement in the field of neuroscience.

First, longevity is increasing. While this is desirable, enhancing the quality of life in tandem with the increasing quantity of life is a better outcome. However, any viable pathway toward better quality of life in this aging population will invariably be built upon fundamental neuroscience research. For instance, our understanding of brain plasticity could help mitigate or even reverse aging induced impedance to cognition, memory formation, and possibly motor control. Similarly, understanding neuronal cellular and molecular dynamics could help control neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Second, the information revolution is rapidly transforming ours into a knowledge society where knowledge and access to knowledge continue to exponentiate. However, even with this, there is little abatement in the costs of secondary and tertiary education. This condition is of particular concern in the developing world where in some instances access to tertiary education is virtually non-existent. Ironically, it is this part of the world that most needs access to quality education to lift itself out of the generational cycle of poverty. The economics here clearly favor early childhood development programs. Programs designed to undergird cognitive, emotional and social foundations, during critical periods of early brain development such as rapid synaptogenesis, for efficient knowledge acquisition in later years. This could have a profound impact on the socio-economic development in much of the developing world over the next three to four decades.

And third, the sustained population growth; projected to take us into the nine billion plus range over the next three decades. Contrary to the pessimistic models put forth by Thomas Malthus and later Paul Ehrlich, I believe our planet and humankind will accommodate this growth. Having said that, anticipating, planning for, and mobilizing resources ahead of this growth can significantly improve outcomes. The challenge lies in the inherent complexity of simulating these growth patterns and the corresponding impact on demand and logistics of resources such as food, water, and energy vis-à-vis environmental impact, quality of life, and continued sustainability over larger population sizes. With deeper insights into the functioning of the brain – specifically its parallel processing ability – new computational models and neural networks could be designed to significantly alleviate this complexity.

At first glance, opportunities embedded in this history of the future may seem overwhelming; requiring the intersection of skills and experiences from diverse disciplines such as computer science, mathematics, physics, chemistry, economics, international and inter-agency relations, quality of life and aging, and of course, neuroscience. By bridging my current background with an immersive study of neuroscience, I hope to be at that optimal intersection of disciplines and experiences to serve humanity in effectively harnessing these opportunities. And, it is to build this bridge that I respectfully seek admission to the Neuroscience Ph.D. Graduate Theme at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Now, on the matter of the Student-CEO equilibrium, I would like to emphasize that while my workload as a CEO is considerable, it is balanced by an equally considerable flexibility in schedule. Based on past experience, I see no difficulty in structuring my work commitments around the demands placed by the Ph.D. program. In addition, I have already initiated the process of relocating my company office closer to the University to reduce the commute between responsibilities. But, despite my willingness and ability to restructure time and reconfigure space, events will occur along the continuum where this equilibrium might be strained. Here, I would like to humbly offer a quote made by my research advisor during my undergraduate thesis defense: “Karim, you often undertake an impossible load but somehow manage to make everything work – easily.” Finally, having already established a successful career as a founder and having served as an international trade ambassador for the State of Alabama, upon graduation, I would be looking to create new – rather than look for – opportunities for furthering neuroscience research and development in Alabama and beyond.

Thank you for your consideration of my application and I hope that my letters of recommendation, GRE score, and this application package, make a strong case for my acceptance into the program. I look forward to working with you in our quest to unlock the secrets of the brain.

Re-Wrapping the Multiverse in a 3lb Package

Stardate: 11288.2

Thanks for the excellent feedback on the first draft everyone. Here is version 2.0 of the application essay. As before, please review and provide your valuable insight, comments, and suggestions. Target date for application submission: December 13, 2012! Thank you all again for your help and positive vibes!

PS: The Topic for the essay again is: “brief summary of your academic interests, career goals, and relevant background experience.”

PS2.0: Here is v2.0 of the essay:


“I used to think that the brain was the most wonderful organ in my body. Then I realized who was telling me this.” – Emo Philips

The two-fold purpose of acquiring knowledge is to better understand the fabric of existence and to serve others. Period. This strand from my ethical genome is the basis for my interest in, and application to, the Neuroscience theme at the UAB GBS. And, I believe, my interdisciplinary educational background, with its strong emphasis on research and innovation, coupled with two decades of professional experience and global service engagements form a strong foundation for successfully completing the program. In addition to highlighting supporting biographical elements, I will also share some of my observations on a history of our future related to neuroscience and the contribution I hope to make in shaping that future.

During my undergraduate years, I had the opportunity to conduct extensive research in computer science, materials science, and economics. At the time, C++ was in its infancy, much about the fundamental properties of borosilicate glasses was yet undiscovered, and the Eurozone was little more than a treaty signed in Maastricht. And yet, two of these research projects culminated in honors theses earning me a magna cum laude and the designation of a double Richter scholar. Much of this success was due to the deliberate inculcation of research fundamentals by my faculty advisors. While the journal publications and theses are now two decades old, the inculcated principles of perseverance, objectivity, and curiosity remain fresh. And fortunately, these enriching encounters with the edges of human knowledge did not end with graduation.

Over the last twenty years, my career path has meandered through many exciting sojourns of collaborations with brilliant minds to develop innovative business models and exciting computational solutions – including artificial intelligence engines to solve NP-hard problems. Intertwined with this, like the second strand of a double helix, my volunteer service engagements add a global context, highlight the role of knowledge deficits in creating socio-economic imbalances and the economics of poverty, and offer a platform for deploying time and knowledge in advancing humanity. As I look to the future from this lens, I see three emergent trends – here in the United States and globally – which provide the impetus for my engagement in the field of neuroscience.

First, longevity is increasing. While this is desirable, enhancing the quality of life in tandem with the increasing quantity of life is a better outcome. However, any viable pathway toward better quality of life in this aging population will invariably be built upon fundamental neuroscience research. For instance, our understanding of brain plasticity could help mitigate or even reverse aging induced impedance to cognition, memory formation, and possibly motor control. Similarly, understanding neuronal cellular and molecular dynamics could help control neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Second, the information revolution is rapidly transforming ours into a knowledge society where knowledge and access to knowledge continue to exponentiate. However, even with this, there is little abatement in the costs of secondary and tertiary education. This condition is of particular concern in the developing world where in some instances access to tertiary education is virtually non-existent. Ironically, it is this part of the world that most needs access to quality education to lift itself out of the generational cycle of poverty. The economics here clearly favor early childhood development programs. Programs designed to undergird cognitive, emotional and social foundations, during critical periods of early brain development such as rapid synaptogenesis, for efficient knowledge acquisition in later years. This could have a profound impact on the socio-economic development in much of the developing world over the next three to four decades.

And third, the sustained population growth; projected to take us into the nine billion plus range over the next three decades. Contrary to the pessimistic models put forth by Thomas Malthus and later Paul Ehrlich, I believe our planet and humankind will accommodate this growth. Having said that, anticipating, planning for, and mobilizing resources ahead of this growth can significantly improve outcomes. New computational models and neural networks modeled on the functioning of our brain could significantly alleviate the inherent complexity in simulating these growth patterns to derive efficient resource management plans including food, water, and energy production, logistics, and consumption vis-à-vis environmental impact, quality of life, and continued sustainability over larger population sizes.

At first glance, opportunities embedded in this history of the future may seem overwhelming; requiring the intersection of skills and experiences from diverse disciplines such as computer science, mathematics, physics, chemistry, economics, international and inter-agency relations, quality of life and aging, and of course, neuroscience. By bridging my current background with an immersive study of neuroscience, I hope to be at that optimal intersection of disciplines and experiences to serve humanity in effectively harnessing these opportunities. And, it is to build this bridge that I respectfully seek admission to the Neuroscience Ph.D. Graduate Theme at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Now, on the matter of the Student-CEO equilibrium, I would like to emphasize that while my workload as a CEO is considerable, it is balanced by an equally considerable flexibility in schedule. Based on past experience, I see no difficulty in structuring my work commitments around the demands placed by the Ph.D. program. In addition, I have already initiated the process of relocating my company office closer to the University to reduce the commute between responsibilities. But, despite my willingness and ability to restructure time and reconfigure space, events will occur along the continuum where this equilibrium might be strained. Here, I would like to humbly offer a quote made by my research advisor during my undergraduate thesis defense: “Karim, you often undertake an impossible load but somehow manage to make everything work – easily.” Finally, having already established a successful career as a founder and having served as an international trade ambassador for the State of Alabama, upon graduation, I would be looking to create new – rather than look for – opportunities for furthering neuroscience research and development in Alabama and beyond.

Thank you for your consideration of my application and I hope that my letters of recommendation, GRE score, and this application package, make a strong case for my acceptance into the program. I look forward to working really long hours with you in our quest to unlock the secrets of the brain.

Wrapping the Multiverse in a 3lb Package

Stardate: 11286.7

As some of you know, I am applying for admission to the Ph.D. program in neuroscience at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. As part of the application, I have been asked to submit a “brief summary of your academic interests, career goals, and relevant background experience.” Here is the first draft of my response. Please review and provide your valuable insight, comments, and suggestions. I hope to submit the application by mid-December, so please wish me luck and send me your feedback – via public comment, facebook, or email – at your earliest. Thank you very much for your help in this endeavor! Here is the essay:


“I used to think that the brain was the most wonderful organ in my body. Then I realized who was telling me this.” – Emo Philips

In my mind, the two-fold purpose of acquiring knowledge is to better understand the fabric of existence and to serve others. Period. This aspect of my philosophical genome amplifies my interest in neuroscience – the window into the seat of human knowledge, the behavior resulting from that knowledge, and the subsequent loopback into that body of knowledge.

During my undergraduate years, I had the opportunity to conduct extensive research in computer science, materials science, and economics; at the time, C++ was in its infancy, much about the fundamental properties of borosilicate glasses was yet undiscovered, and the Eurozone was little more than a treaty signed in Maastricht. My research advisors and fellow team members helped me rigorously explore, fully internalize, and, subsequently, distill and share the resulting knowledge. Two of these research projects culminated in honors theses earning me a magna cum laude and the designation of a double Richter scholar. Fortunately, these enriching encounters with the edges of human knowledge did not end with graduation. Over the last twenty years, my career path has meandered through many exciting sojourns of collaborations with brilliant minds to develop innovative business models and exciting computational solutions – including artificial intelligence engines to solve NP-hard problems. Intertwined with this, like the second strand of a double helix, my volunteer service engagements add a global context, highlight the role of knowledge deficits in creating socio-economic imbalances and the economics of poverty, and offer a platform for deploying time and knowledge in advancing humanity.

As I look to the future in my current professional and volunteer capacities, three emergent trends – both here in the United States and globally – provide the impetus for my engagement in the field of neuroscience. First, longevity is increasing. While this is desirable, enhancing the quality of life in tandem with the increasing quantity of life is a better outcome which can be achieved through a deeper understanding of brain plasticity, for instance, and its implications on lifelong learning and in mitigating debilitating conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. Second, the information revolution is rapidly transforming ours into a knowledge society where knowledge and access to knowledge continue to exponentiate. However, even with this, there is little abatement in the costs of secondary and tertiary education, highlighting the cost-value advantage of programs designed to strengthen cognitive, emotional and social foundations during critical periods, such as the rapid synaptogenesis, of early brain development as the undergird for efficient knowledge acquisition in later years. In many countries, such a shift in focus to early childhood development could help dramatically impact its socio-economic development over the course of the next three to four decades. And finally, the sustained population growth; projected to take us into the nine billion plus range over the next three decades. Contrary to the pessimistic models put forth by Thomas Malthus and later Paul Ehrlich, I believe our planet and humankind will accommodate this growth. Having said that, anticipating, planning for, and mobilizing resources ahead of this growth can significantly improve outcomes. New computational models and neural networks developed based on the functioning of the brain would be needed to alleviate the inherent complexity in simulating these growth patterns to derive efficient resource management plans including food, water, and energy production, logistics, and consumption vis-à-vis environmental impact, quality of life, and continued sustainability over larger population sizes.

By bridging my current background with an immersive study of neuroscience, I hope to be at the optimal intersection of disciplines and experiences to serve humanity in effectively addressing these challenges. And, it is to build this bridge that I respectfully seek admission to the Neuroscience Ph.D. Graduate Theme at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Now, in speaking with Patricia about the program, I learnt that the neuroscience theme at UAB is very intense and that applicants with a full time employment may trigger time management concerns during the application review. As a CEO, a father of twin toddlers, and a citizen with substantial community service commitments, there may be some concern about my ability to juggle these responsibilities and still contribute successfully to the neuroscience program. In order to put those concerns in perspective, I would ask the admissions committee to please consider that while my workload as a CEO is considerable, it is balanced by an equally considerable flexibility in schedule. Based on past experience, I see no difficulty in structuring my work commitments around the demands placed by the Ph.D. program. Here, I would also like to humbly offer a quote made by my research advisor during my undergraduate thesis defense: “Karim, you often undertake an impossible load but somehow manage to make everything work – easily.” Further, I would like to ask the admissions committee to consider the positive aspects of my having established a successful career as a founder and CEO of an innovation-based enterprise and recently an international trade ambassador for the State of Alabama; upon graduation I would be looking to create new – rather than look for – opportunities for furthering neuroscience research and development in Alabama and beyond.

I recognize that the program is very competitive, however, I hope that my letters of recommendation, GRE score, and this application package, make a strong case for my acceptance into the program. Thank you and I look forward to working really long hours with you in our quest to unlock the secrets of the brain.

What’s in a Name?

Stardate: 11144.8

What’s in a name? Well, it depends. When you stop and think about it, a name is one of the most durable – not to mention, cost-effective – gifts that a parent can give to their children.  And in my case, this gift was particularly valuable, as it’s meaning “noble and generous” helped me with various decisions in life.  At any crossroad, I simply had to ask myself, what would be the noble or generous thing to do!  Yep, my parents were simply genius in their approach to naming!!

So, obviously, when it came time to pick names for our darling twin boys, Henna and I paid particular attention to the meaning, philosophy, and attributes around the names.  Oh, and Henna loves long names, so the names had to be substantial!  ;-D  We sifted through history, philosophy, and mythology texts to divine names that drew upon our heritage to reflect (a) a celebrated friendship, (b) a unifying message for humanity, and (c) have a certain “muchness” about them!

Our quest for celebrated friendships began with that of Prophet Mohammed and Hazrat Ali, followed by various esoteric parallels such as Prophet Moses (Musa) and Aaron (Harun) in Judaism and further on to the primordial souls of the Creator – Guru Brahma – and the Sustainer – Bhagwan Vishnu from the Vedic scriptures. It would be appropriate to mention at this point that Bhagwan Kishan (or Krishna) is an avatar of Bhagwan Vishnu.  With these as anchors, we reached out across cultural frontiers to identify their second names (did I mention Henna loves long names?) to complete the message of cross-frontier unity.  The result:

Brahma Mubarak and Khidr Kishan!

While the arabic word Mubarak has no direct translation in the English language, it can be described as infinite blessings in, both, the spiritual and temporal realms. And Khidr, with his timeless knowledge and wisdom, is the mythical teacher of the Prophets in the Abrahamic traditions!

So, what’s in a name?  Well, for our darling twin princes: the souls of the Creator and Sustainer coupled with infinite wisdom and blessings to serve and unite humanity!

*Key: [BRuh-Mah,  Moo-BahRuhK]   and   [KHi-Der,  Ki-SHuhN]

The Leaning Tower: Global Infrastructure

Stardate: 11022.7

First, Navroz Mubarak!  May the new year bring peace, prosperity, opportunity, and profit for all!  ;-D  It has been a while since my last post where I started my discussion of the WEF Global Risks report for 2010.  I had indicated that I would follow-up with two additional posts on the matter.  Well, here’s one.  Enjoy!

While discussing the appendicular skeleton in an audiobook on human anatomy, the lecturer caught my attention by noting a remarkable (and often taken for granted) attribute of our intra-structure; as the human body grows, the bones on one side of the our bodies grow evenly with respect to those on the other, without any direct measurement or communication mechanism!  The left femur and the right femur grow pretty much at the same pace keeping the overall body in balance!  In a few cases, however, bones on one side of the body grow faster than their counterparts on the other side impeding the individual’s motor abilities.

The Present:

While this condition is rare in skeletons, it is NOT uncommon in the economies of developing – and sometimes even developed – nations; where development in one socio-economic aspect significantly outpaces others.  The WEF report cites examples of villages in Africa and South America that lack basic infrastructure needs, such as running water and sanitation, situated alongside state-of-the-art highways and port facilities.  These imbalances, and the risks they pose, are no longer a matter merely of academic discourse or limited to esoteric economic debate.  Similar ideas are increasingly being portrayed via classical pop-culture vehicles; recall images of world-class call centers juxtaposed with feeble transportation infrastructure from Slumdog Millionaire!

The Past:

Drawing from the hundreds of encounters I have had with (now Late) Dr. Spellman’s guns-and-butter graphs from my undergraduate economics classes, some of this skewed development could be attributed to the undesirable side effects of comparative advantage among nations.  However, let’s not be quick to exculpate other dubious – not malicious perhaps, but certainly irresponsible – contributors, including (1) hypermyopic mining of resources and markets by quarterly-report driven initiatives, (2) weak or absent government oversight, (3) corruption, and so on.

Key observations from the WEF Report:

  • Challenge: To address infrastructure needs with a vision for sustainable and resource-efficient approach to projects (hmmm… sounds like a page out of the AKF handbook)
  • Last decade saw the rise of public-private partnerships on large infrastructure projects (I’m thinking PartnershipsInAction)
  • Must establish and share best practices, expert knowledge, and enabling technologies across frontiers
  • Infrastructure levels must be achieved in economically and environmentally sustainable manner (more green: wallet and planet)
  • Agriculture and food security related infrastructure concerns:
    • 1 Billion people went hungry in 2009
    • World population is increasing with roughly 75% of the world’s poor living in rural areas
    • Population growth leads to higher demands, not just for food but, also for water and energy required to produce and transport that food

The Future:

In many forecasting models, the recent past is used to estimate the immediate future.  So, where do we go from here?  Now that we recognize where we are and what got us here, what steps can we take to treat this condition?  Here are some initial thoughts that come to mind:

1. Countries of Opportunity: Developing nations are increasingly becoming countries of real opportunity.  Both, as a market for goods and services, and a source of talent and natural resources.  Going forward, we need to abandon the locust-approach to multinational ventures, which may yield profits in the short-term but is ultimately self-defeating for everyone – including the locust.  Instead, all parties should approach the venture as partners, seeking a truly win-win opportunity over the long-haul.  Let’s take that one step further.  Let’s start the dialog on what we can do collectively to make more and more countries, countries of real opportunity.  Imagine the potential of turning a deficit-oriented view of the developing world into an asset-oriented one where we take proactive measures on continuously nurturing new opportunity!

2. Green: Any discussion including “long-haul” should not ignore consequences on the environment.  We need a planet on which to pursue economic opportunity.

3. Civil Society: The Aga Khan Foundation was certainly avant-garde in recognizing the condition of skewed development and in systematically promoting, over the last 40 years, public-private partnerships to further sustainable development.  In the future, it is my estimate that organizations such as the Foundation and the broader civil society will continue to play a significant role in furthering sustainable and balanced development.  Governments and private enterprises alone cannot – and should not – be burdened with this task.  Sustainable development is our collective responsibility and we need to step up to it! 😀

4. Knowledge: Access to education – good education – must be made universal.  Further, we should facilitate the sharing of best practices, expert knowledge, tools, and technology.  Here again, the attitude should be of partnership, we should seek to learn from each other.

5. Addressing Corruption: Another classic example of the locust mindset, corruption, must be addressed.  Of course, this malaise would start somewhat self-correcting with the improvement of socio-economic conditions which would result from countries becoming countries of opportunity!  But, that does not mean that we allow corruption to impede progress in the interim!

A self-proclaimed econoptimist, I believe that we will move in this direction.  Our approach may be gradual at first, due to this Global Short Leg Syndrome.  But as we recover, we will develop better motor control, picking up the pace toward sustainable development!

Identifying and Managing Risk

Stardate: 11015.7

Notwithstanding all the pressing items on my to-do list, I resolved to review and comment on the Global Risks report for 2010 from the recent World Economic Forum by the end of this week.  With only 25 hours at hand and a daunting list of must-complete items still on that pesky list, it appears we may have a race against that thing called *time* once again.  Funny thing, this week has been unusually intense with back-to-back meetings; in person or on conference calls.  Now add to that logistical challenges of coordinating calls with team members spread in timezones across 4 continents; North America all timezones, Europe, Asia, and Australia!  As intense as it has been, I must admit, I am thoroughly enjoying it!! I guess that makes me a Workafrolic!!! (Richard St. John’s TED presentation)

In any case, while there are several risks identified in the report with varying levels of inter-connectedness, likelihoods of realization, and severity, my attention is drawn to:

1. continued unemployment and underemployment; echoes from the stalking recession
2. skewed, inadequate, or virtually non-existent infrastructure capacity; unsustainable development
3. energy myopia;

In Constantine (the movie), the angel Gabriel declares that humanity is at its best when faced with adversity (or something along those lines). However, I believe the archangel jumped to an incomplete conclusion. Humanity is at its best… tactically. In putting all our focus in the seemingly insurmountable challenges at hand, we sometimes tend to neglect the strategic view; the more severe the current issues, the more we tend to compromise on future think. And while this may be justified in many cases (for what good is the heavy bag of food if I am to drown), it is not always the prudent position (shed the weight of the bag of food to avoid drowning, only to be washed ashore starving).

In the little that I have reviewed, I have been pleased with the report’s balance in addressing short-term and long-term issues. In fact, a significant emphasis is on the long-term; I must say, I am impressed. So, between now and tomorrow nite, I will endeavor to review the report and supporting research particularly in the areas of the aforementioned 3 risks (or risk components) and share some comments with you 😀  Stay tuned…

Zervan Paused

Stardate: 11011.0

While we can move from point to point in space, why does it appear that we can only travel one-way in time? Is there an arrow of time, or can we travel back in time as well? The laws of physics do not prohibit the uncracking of an egg, however, observing this in practice is limited to experiments with apparatus capable of playing videos in reverse!  Perhaps, we are going about this all (forgive the expression) backwards.  Maybe, there is no arrow of time but an arrow of experience.  Take the uncracking egg for instance, even if we were able to successfully conduct that experiment, it would be a series of events culminating into the reformation of the egg.  Again an arrow moving forward from a state of high-entropy into one of lower-entropy – the direction remaining forward nonetheless!  So, maybe we can travel back and forth and sideways in time, however, our capacity to experience events is limited and constrains us to this forward facing arrow.  So, that’s the first point: there is ONLY a perceived arrow of time resulting from the arrow of experience.

Here is another mind-bender for you to consider should you have the time.  Einstein stopped at a 4-dimensional universe; 3 dimensions of space and 1 of time.  Subsequently, other theories (specifically, string theory) have proposed additional space dimensions – as many as 7 additional dimensions (at least in stable representations).  But, what I’m more interested in is additional dimensions in time.  What if time as we know it was simply one dimension of a 3D time?  For ease in visualization, let’s use familiar Euclidean notations to describe points in this 3D time; ( tx tk tz ). Where tx represents our familiar notion of time; the arrow of experience based time. So far, so good? For a second (like that means anything) don’t worry about what tk and tz represent – we will get to that later.

Now, hold up a piece of paper in your hand so that you can see full sheet with the bottom edge of the paper at eye-level. Next, rotate it so that the top edge of the paper moves away from you. At some point, instead of seeing the whole sheet, all you will see is a line. Apply this same logic to the temporal plan txtk. The angle at which our faculties can experience the plane txtk is so constrained that we can only perceive a flattened forward-only straight arrow of time! Now, imagine a whole stack of paper – infinitely tall – and you come face-to-face with Zervan!

More elaboration on tk (karma) and tz (Zervan) in a later post!